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Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München

Walter-Brendel-Zentrum für Experimentelle Medizin

Postdoctoral or PhD student position available starting in April/May 2013 in Munich/Germany

Our laboratory is investigating how circadian, daily rhythms affect leukocyte migration and the immune response. We are particularly interested in how this is regulated by the nervous system with a focus on nerve-vessel interactions. We use in vivo imaging techniques as well as flow cytometry and biochemical assays to elucidate the mechanistic details of these oscillations.

The candidate should be very enthusiastic and have proven experience (as shown by first-author publications - for postdocs only) in the leukocyte trafficking field such as in vivo imaging and/or flow cytometry. Please send your CV and two letters of reference to Christoph Scheiermann.

Dr. Christoph Scheiermann has been awarded the prestigious Emmy-Noether-Grant from the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft. The group focuses on circadian rhythms in the immune response and is associated with the SFB914 ‘Trafficking of Immune Cells in Inflammation, Development and Disease’ (http://www.sfb914.med.uni-muenchen.de/index.html). The recruitment of leukocytes to tissues and their localization within tissues plays a crucial role in the immune response. Recruitment of leukocytes to tissues underlies a circadian, i.e daily rhythm. This supports accumulating evidence for circadian oscillations in many components of the immune system with the potential to affect disease onset and therapies. The group studies leukocyte migration patterns using various intravital microscopy techniques in different tissues. Specifically, the focus is on how neural influences regulate the circadian migration of leukocytes to tissues, which promigratory factors control these rhythms and whether they can be altered by surgical, pharmacological or genetic interventions. The goal is to provide novel mechanistic insight into the systemic regulation of leukocyte trafficking with the potential for time-based, i.e. chronotherapeutic, interventions in inflammatory diseases.

Details


Adresse:
Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München
Walter-Brendel-Zentrum für Experimentelle Medizin
Marchioninistr. 27
81377 München
Deutschland
Arbeitsgebiet:
Forschung & Lehre
Klinik & Praxis
Expansion:
national